streets

Mayfair

(I will share the pictures once i’m back home from traveling) 🙂

1. Wikipedia link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayfair

Mayfair on the UK version of Monopoly board is not a street, but actually an affluent area in the West End of London towards the east edge of Hyde Park, in the City of Westminster. The district is mainly commercial, with many former homes converted into offices for major corporate headquarters, embassies, as well as hedge funds and real estate businesses. There remains a substantial quantity of residential property as well as some upmarket shops and restaurants, as well as London’s largest concentration of five star hotels. Rents are among the highest in London and the world and its prestigious status has been commemorated by being the most expensive property square on the London Monopoly board.

Mayfair is the most expensive property on the London Monopoly board at £400. The price is a reference to the high rents of the area.

2. Zone:

Zone 1

3. Nearest tube:

While there are no London Underground stations inside Mayfair, there are several on the boundaries. Marble Arch, Bond Street and Oxford Circus along Oxford Street are on the northern boundary, whilst Piccadilly Circus and Green Park are along Piccadilly on the southern boundary, with Hyde Park Corner close by in Knightsbridge.

Down Street tube station is in the area, but was closed in 1932; it was used during the Second World War by the Emergency Railway Committee, and briefly by Churchill and the war cabinet while waiting for the War Rooms to be ready. While there is only one bus route in Mayfair itself, the 24-hour route C2, there are many bus routes along the perimeter roads, Oxford Street, Regent Street, Piccadilly, and Park Lane.

– Marble Arch station – Central line.
– Bond Street station – Central, Jubilee lines.
– Oxford Circus station – Bakerloo, Central, Victoria lines.
– Piccadilly Circus station – Bakerloo, Piccadilly lines.
– Green Park station – Jubilee, Piccadilly, Victoria lines.
– Hyde Park Corner station – Piccadilly line.

Find your ways using Google map direction or the Transport For London (TFL) journey planner. There should be various modes of transportation available based on departure time, line closure, and user preferences e.g. fastest route, least walking, route with fewest change, etc.

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streets

Park Lane

(I will share the pictures once i’m back home from traveling) 🙂

1. Wikipedia link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Park_Lane

Park Lane is the second most valuable property in the London edition of the board game Monopoly. The street had a prestigious social status when the British version of the Monopoly board was first produced, in 1936. On the board, Park Lane forms a pair with Mayfair, the most expensive property in the game. The squares were designed to be equivalents of Park Place and Boardwalk, respectively, on the original board, which used streets in Atlantic City, New Jersey. In 1988, the World Monopoly Championships were held at the Park Lane Hotel, sponsored by Waddingtons, manufacturers of the British version. Since the game’s original production, prices on the real Park Lane have held their value, though average rent costs have been overtaken by Bond Street.

2. Zone:

Zone 1

3. Nearest tube:

– Marble Arch station – Central line.
– Hyde Park Corner station – Piccadilly line.

Find your ways using Google map direction or the Transport For London (TFL) journey planner. There should be various modes of transportation available based on departure time, line closure, and user preferences e.g. fastest route, least walking, route with fewest change, etc.

streets

Bond Street

(I will share the pictures once i’m back home from traveling) 🙂

1. Wikipedia link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bond_Street

Bond Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London. It links Piccadilly in the south to Oxford Street in the north and has been popular for retail since the 18th century, being the home of many fashion outlets that sell prestigious and expensive items. The southern section is Old Bond Street and the longer northern section New Bond Street; a distinction not generally made in everyday usage.

2. Zone:

Zone 1

3. Nearest tube:

Bond Street station – Central, Jubilee lines (New Bond Street)
Oxford Circus station – Bakerloo, Central, Victoria lines (New Bond Street)
Green Park station – Jubilee line, Piccadilly line, Victoria lines (Old Bond Street)

Find your ways using Google map direction or the Transport For London (TFL) journey planner. There should be various modes of transportation available based on departure time, line closure, and user preferences e.g. fastest route, least walking, route with fewest change, etc.

streets

Oxford Street

(I will share the pictures once i’m back home from traveling) 🙂

1. Wikipedia link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_Street

Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London. It is Europe’s busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis.

Oxford Street runs for approximately 1.2 miles (1.9 km). From Marble Arch, where it meets Park Lane, Edgware Road, and its westward continuation Bayswater Road, it runs east past Vere Street, New Bond Street and Bond Street station, up to Oxford Circus, where it meets Regent Street.

Oxford Street is home to a number of major department stores and flagship retail outlets, containing over 300 shops as of 2012. It is the most frequently visited shopping street in Inner London, attracting over half a million daily visitors in 2014, and is one of the most popular destinations in London for tourists, with an annual estimated turnover of over £1 billion. It forms part of a shopping district in the West End of London, along with other streets including Covent Garden, Bond Street and Piccadilly.

Every Christmas, Oxford Street is decorated with festive lights. The tradition of Christmas lights began in 1959, five years after the neighbouring Regent Street. There were no light displays in 1976 or 1977 due to economic recession, but the lights returned in 1978 when Oxford Street organised a laser display, and they have been there every year since.

2. Zone:

Zone 1

3. Nearest tube:

Marble Arch station – Central line
Bond Street station – Central, Jubilee line
Oxford Circus station – Bakerloo, Central, Victoria lines
Tottenham Court Road station – Central, Northern line

Find your ways using Google map direction or the Transport For London (TFL) journey planner. There should be various modes of transportation available based on departure time, line closure, and user preferences e.g. fastest route, least walking, route with fewest change, etc.

streets

Regent Street

(I will share the pictures once i’m back home from traveling) 🙂

1. Wikipedia link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regent_Street

Regent Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London. It is named after George, the Prince Regent (later George IV) and was built under the direction of the architect John Nash. The street runs from Waterloo Place in St James’s at the southern end, through Piccadilly Circus and Oxford Circus, to All Soul’s Church. From there Langham Place and Portland Place continue the route to Regent’s Park.

Regent Street is approximately 0.8 miles (1.3 km) long and begins at a junction with Charles II Street as a continuation of Waterloo Place. It runs north to Piccadilly Circus, where it turns left before curving round the Quadrant to head north again, meeting Oxford Street at Oxford Circus. It ends at a junction with Cavendish Place and Mortimer Street near the BBC Broadcasting House, with the road ahead being Langham Place, followed by Portland Place.

Regent Street is a location on the British version of Monopoly as a group of three green squares with Oxford Street and Bond Street. The three properties are grouped together as they are all known for their retail and commercial backgrounds.

2. Zone:

Zone 1

3. Nearest tube:

Oxford Circus station – Bakerloo, Central, Victoria lines
Piccadilly Circus station – Bakerloo, Piccadilly line

Find your ways using Google map direction or the Transport For London (TFL) journey planner. There should be various modes of transportation available based on departure time, line closure, and user preferences e.g. fastest route, least walking, route with fewest change, etc.

 

streets

Piccadilly

 

(I will share the pictures once i’m back home from traveling) 🙂

1. Wikipedia link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piccadilly

Piccadilly (/ˌpɪkəˈdɪli/) is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner in the west and Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl’s Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway westward. St James’s is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. At just under 1 mile (1.6 km) in length, Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.

2. Zone:

Zone 1

3. Nearest tube:

Green Park station – Jubilee, Piccadilly, Victoria lines.
Piccadilly Circus station – Bakerloo, Piccadilly lines.

Find your ways using Google map direction or the Transport For London (TFL) journey planner. There should be various modes of transportation available based on departure time, line closure, and user preferences e.g. fastest route, least walking, route with fewest change, etc.

streets

Coventry Street

 

From Lego Store in Leceister Square and M&M’s World in Leicester Street, we walked further to Conventry Street. The same road will bring us to Piccadilly too.

(I will share the pictures once i’m back home from traveling) 🙂

1. Wikipedia link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coventry_Street

Coventry Street is a short street in the West End of London, connecting Piccadilly Circus to Leicester Square. Part of the street is a section of the A4, a major road through London. It is named after the politician Henry Coventry, secretary of state to Charles II.

Coventry Street is one of the yellow property squares on the British Monopoly board. The other squares are Leicester Square and Piccadilly, both of which connect to it. All three streets share a common theme of entertainment and nightlife.

2. Zone:

Zone 1

3. Nearest tube:

Leicester Square station – Northern, Piccadilly lines.
Piccadilly Circus station – Bakerloo, Piccadilly lines.

Find your ways using Google map direction or the Transport For London (TFL) journey planner. There should be various modes of transportation available based on departure time, line closure, and user preferences e.g. fastest route, least walking, route with fewest change, etc.